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Golf Course

Inspiring Golf In A Pristine, Natural Environment


Meadowlark Golf Club's beautiful par-70, 5,609-yard championship golf course was designed by noted golf course architect in the old style, leaving the terrain completely natural. Large stands of mature trees frame gently rolling Bermuda and kikuyu fairways and manicured undulating greens, with a variety of picturesque water features, unique bunkering and indigenous flora and fauna creating both strategic diversity and a stunning backdrop for golf.

While challenging for scratch golfers, the course features multiple tees on each hole, enabling golfers of all ages and abilities an opportunity to enjoy this must-play Southern California golf gem. Complementing the course is an expansive golf practice facility including a 35-station, night-lit driving range and a short game area.

course

information

  • Total Holes: 18
  • Par: 70
  • Year Opened: 1922
  • Tees (Grass Type): Bermuda & Kikuyu
  • Fairways (Grass Type): Bermuda & Kikuyu
  • Greens (Grass Type): Poa Annua
  • Designer: William P. Bell

William P. Bell Bio

William P. Bell studied agriculture at Duff's Business Institute in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He moved to California in 1911, and held a series of golf jobs at the Pasadena Country Club, including caddy master and course superintendent. Bell worked on golf course construction for architect Willie Watson, including serving as Watson's superintendent, before going into golf course design and development on his own in 1920.

Considered one of the most important golf course architects in California, Bell designed more than 50 courses in Southern California as well as numerous courses throughout Nevada, Arizona, Oregon and Hawaii. Among his most distinctive work, Bell worked closely with famous designer and fellow Pennsylvanian George C. Thomas, Jr., on Los Angeles' Riviera Country Club, regarded among the world's best courses. Bell's son, William F. Bell (born in Pasadena in 1918), trained with him, joined him in partnership after World War II, and later became an important golf course architect in his own right.

Bell Sr. served as a turf consultant to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers during World War II, and was awarded a commendation by the Southern California chapter of the PGA of America, in honor of his work creating golf courses for wounded heroes. Bell Sr. was a founding member of the American Society of Golf Course Architects, and served as ASGCA president in 1952.